Find WordPress category ID by category name using SQL

Problem:

You need the wordpress category ID for a given category name (e.g. My category), e.g. for a shortcode filter.

Solution:

You can use a SQL statement to find the correct category for your term (i.e. the category name, My category). Run this statement in your database administration interface, e.g. phpmyadmin.

SELECT termtax.term_taxonomy_id FROM wp_terms AS terms JOIN wp_term_taxonomy AS termtax ON terms.term_id = termtax.term_id WHERE terms.name = "My category"

Replace My category at the end by the category name you’re looking for.

Get the original language post ID for WPML-translated posts

Problem:

You have a post that has been translated into multiple languages using WPML.
You want to find out the ID of the original post, i.e. the equivalent post in the source langugae.

Solution:

As far as I know, there is no WPML API for this. You can, however, use $wpdb in order to query the database directly.

Here’s the SQL statement:

SELECT trans2.element_id
FROM wp_icl_translations AS trans1
INNER JOIN wp_icl_translations AS trans2
ON trans2.trid = trans1.trid
WHERE trans1.element_id = #myid#
AND trans2.source_language_code IS NULLs

where #myid# is the ID of your current (possibly translated) post.

The algorithm works like this:

  1. Find out the  translation ID (column trid) for the current post by selecting the row for the given post ID (column element_id)
  2. Find all rows with the same translation ID
  3. Select only the row where the source language is NULL – this is the original post.

You can use it like this:

global $wpdb;
$orig_lang_id = $wpdb->get_var("SELECT trans2.element_id FROM wp_icl_translations AS trans1 INNER JOIN wp_icl_translations AS trans2 ON trans2.trid = trans1.trid WHERE trans1.element_id = ".get_the_ID()." AND trans2.source_language_code IS NULL");

and then use $orig_lang_id where required. Note that $orig_lang_id is NULL if the query fails. The main reason for the query to fail is if there is no entry for the given post ID in the wp_icl_translations table.

If the current post is the source post, $orig_lang_id is the same as get_the_ID(), i.e. the current ID of the post.

In my test, the code still works (i.e. returns the correct post ID) even when creating brand-new entry without any translations being present.

linkchecker: Ignore WordPress XMLRPC

Problem:

You are using linkchecker to check your WordPress site, but you get the following error multiple times:

$ linkchecker https://techoverflow.net
URL        `https://techoverflow.net/xmlrpc.php'
Parent URL https://techoverflow.net/, line 8, col 1
Real URL   https://techoverflow.net/xmlrpc.php
Check time 1.394 seconds
Result     Error: 405 Method Not Allowed

Solution:

Installing a plugin that disables XMLRPC doesn’t help here –  because the XMLRPC pingback link will still be present on every page.

Instead, just tell linkchecker to ignore the XMLRPC link altogether:

linkchecker https://techoverflow.net --ignore-url=/xmlrpc.php$

 

Solving Docker permission denied while trying to connect to the Docker daemon socket

Problem:

You are trying to run a docker container or do the docker tutorial, but you only get an error message like this:

docker: Got permission denied while trying to connect to the Docker daemon socket at unix:///var/run/docker.sock: Post http://%2Fvar%2Frun%2Fdocker.sock/v1.26/containers/create: dial unix /var/run/docker.sock: connect: permission denied.
See 'docker run --help'.

 Solution:

The error message tells you that your current user can’t access the docker engine, because you’re lacking permissions to access the unix socket to communicate with the engine.

As a temporary solution, you can use sudo to run the failed command as root.
However it is recommended to fix the issue by adding the current user to the docker group:

Run this command in your favourite shell and then completely log out of your account and log back in (if in doubt, reboot!):

sudo usermod -a -G docker $USER

After doing that, you should be able to run the command without any issues. Run docker run hello-world as a normal user in order to check if it works. Reboot if the issue still persists.

Logging out and logging back in is required because the group change will not have an effect unless your session is closed.

requests: Download file if it doesn’t exist

Problem:

You want to download a URL to a file using the requests python library, but you want to skip the download if it doesn’t exist

Solution:

Use the following functions:

import requests
import os.path

def download_file(filename, url):
    """
    Download an URL to a file
    """
    with open(filename, 'wb') as fout:
        response = requests.get(url, stream=True)
        response.raise_for_status()
        # Write response data to file
        for block in response.iter_content(4096):
            fout.write(block)

def download_if_not_exists(filename, url):
    """
    Download a URL to a file if the file
    does not exist already.

    Returns
    -------
    True if the file was downloaded,
    False if it already existed
    """
    if not os.path.exists(filename):
        download_file(filename, url)
        return True
    return False

 

An introduction to Z-boxes

You most likely found this post for one of two reasons:

  • Either you haven’t heard of Z-Boxes and are interested in if they can somehow help you
  • or you have to learn about Z-Boxes and you have absolutely no idea how to understand the mathematical definitions.

Either way, we’re going to investigate Z-Boxes – not using a box of formulas but using examples and Python code.

Read more

Removing spans/divs with style attributes from HTML

Occasionally I have to clean up some HTML code – mostly because parts of it were pasted into a CMS like WordPress from rich text editor like Word.

I’ve noticed that the formatting I want to remove is mostly based on span and div elements with a style attribute. Therefore, I’ve written a simple Python script based on BeautifulSoup4 which will replace certain tags with their contents if they have a style attribute. While in some cases some other formatting might be destroyed by such a script, it is very useful for some recurring usecases.

Read more

Advantages and disadvantages of hugepages

In a previous post, I’ve written about how to check and enable transparent hugepages in Linux globally.

Although this post is important if you actually have a usecase for hugepages, I’ve seen multiple people getting fooled by the prospect that hugepages will magically increase performance. However, hugepaging is a complex topic and, if used in the wrong way, might easily decrease overall performance. Read more

In-place trimming/stripping in C

For an explanation of in-place algorithms see my previous post on zero-copy in-place splitting

The problem

You have a C string possibly containing whitespace at the beginning and/or the end.

char* s = " abc   \n\r";

Using an in-place algorithm, you want to remove the whitespace from this string.

Doing this is also possible using boost::algorithm::trim, but it has the same caveats as boost::algorithm::split as discussed in my previous post about C splitting Read more

How to interpret smartctl messages like ‘Error: UNC at LBA’?

When running smartctl on your hard drive, you often get a plethora of information that can be hard to interpret for unexperienced users. This post attempts to provide aid in interpreting what the technical reasons behind the error messages are. If you’re looking for advice on whether to replace your hard drive, the only guidance I can give you is it might fail any time, so better backup your data, but it might also run for many years to come.. Furthermore, this article does not describe basic SMART WHEN_FAILED checking but rather interpretation of more subtle signs of possibly impending HDD failures.

Read more

Accurate calculation of PT100/PT1000 temperature from resistance

TL;DR for impatient readers

PT100/PT1000 temperatures calculation suffers from accuracy issues for large sub-zero temperatures. UliEngineering implements a polynomial-fit based algorithm to provide 58.6 \mu{\degree}C peak-error over the full defined temperature range from -200 {\degree}C to +850 °C.

Use this code snippet (replace pt1000_ by pt100- to use PT100 coefficients) to compute an accurate temperature (in degrees celsius) e.g. for a resistane of 829.91 Ω of a PT1000 sensor.

from UliEngineering.Physics.RTD import pt1000_temperature
# The following calls are equivalent and print -43.2316359463
print(pt1000_temperature("829.91 Ω"))
print(pt1000_temperature(829.91))

You install the library (compatible to Python 3.2+) using

$ pip3 install git+https://github.com/ulikoehler/UliEngineering.git

Read more

Reusing your calendars, the pythonic way

Yesterday got a calendar for 2016. An interesting question came up my mind: When can I reuse this calendar, and for which year can I reuse which old calendar?

The 1st January 2015 was a Thursday. The same day in 2016 is a Friday. Once you follow this pattery you will quickly recognize that the base period of seven years is disrupted by leap years.

It quickly turns out that for some years it takes decades until you can reuse a calendar: 2016 is a leap yer, so you can not reuse it for 2044.

However, there’s a neat quirk that is currently unimplemented in online services like whencanireusethiscalendar.com: You can partially reuse a calendar.

Read more

Automated domain name extraction from Let’s Encrypt certificate transparency logs

A few days ago, Let’s Encrypt into public beta. At the time of writing this article, almost 120k certificateshave been issued, including the certificate for TechOverflow.

I really like the Let’s Encrypt service and I believe it might actually change the way people perceive HTTPS encryption. However, there is one rarely-mentioned side-effect when protecting your domains with their certificates.

Let’s Encrypt publishes certificate transparency logs at crt.sh. This transparency does not come without side-effects, however: crt.sh effectively publishes.

In other words, hiding sites from the public by not publishing their (sub-)domain names anywhere will not work when you issue a certificate for the domain on services like Let’s Encrypt.

Read more

nginx Let’s Encrypt authentication for reverse-proxy sites

Problem:

You have an nginx host that is configured as reverse-proxy-only like this:

server {
    server_name  my.domain;
    [...]
    location / {
        proxy_pass http://localhost:1234;
    }
}

For this host, you want to use Let’s Encrypt to automatically issue a certificate using the webroot method like this:

certbot certonly -a webroot --webroot-path ??? -d my.domain

The reverse-proxied webserver does not provide a webroot to use for the automated autentication process and you want to keep the flexibility of updating the cert at any time without manually modifying the nginx configuration.

Read more