Networking

How to leave netmaker network

Once you have used netclient join to join a netmaker network, you can use

netclient leave --network mynetwork

to permanently leave the network named mynetwork (until you re-join of course).

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in Networking, VPN

How to load & start EMQX plugin using emqx_ctl

You can easily load (& start) an EMQX plugin such as emqx_auth_mnesia

./bin/emqx_ctl plugins load emqx_auth_mnesia

If you are using docker-compose and your container is named emqx, you can use

docker-compose exec ./bin/emqx_ctl plugins load emqx_auth_mnesia

After running this command, the plugin will show up as Running in the dashboard:

Posted by Uli Köhler in EMQX, MQTT

How to change EMQX admin password

Changing the password is as simple as

./bin/emqx_ctl admins passwd admin "[new password]"

If you are using docker-compose and your container is named emqx, you can use

docker-compose exec ./bin/emqx_ctl admins passwd admin "[new password]"
Posted by Uli Köhler in EMQX, MQTT

What is the EMQX default username & password

The default credentials for EMQX are:

  • Username: admin
  • Password:public

It should go without saying that you must change the password!

Posted by Uli Köhler in EMQX, MQTT

What is the EMQX default password for the ‘admin’ account?

The default password for the EMQX admin account is publicChange it as soon as possible 🙂

Posted by Uli Köhler in EMQX, MQTT

How to run emqx_ctl for docker-compose-based EMQX setups

You can simply run emqx_ctl using the following command:

docker-compose exec emqx ./bin/emqx_ctl [command]

where emqx is the name of the container to run emqx_ctl in.

Example:

docker-compose exec emqx ./bin/emqx_ctl status

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in EMQX, MQTT

How to fix docker emqx_ctl Node ’[email protected]’ not responding to pings.

Problem:

When trying to run emqx_ctl in a dockerized emqx setup using a command like

docker-compose exec emqx ./bin/emqx status

you see an error message like

Node '[email protected]' not responding to pings.
/opt/emqx/bin/emqx: line 41: die: command not found

Solution:

The problem here is that emqx_ctl is trying to connect to the IP address for node1.emqx.mydomain.com but that IP address does not point to the IP address for the docker container (maybe it’s the public IP address for your server?)

The solution here is to create a network alias within docker/docker-compose so that the Docker DNS system resolves node1.emqx.mydomain.com to the internal IP address of the container.

For example, in docker-compose, you can create your network using

networks:
  emqx:
    driver: bridge

and then configure the alias for the container using

services:
  emqx:
    image: emqx:4.4.4
    environment:
      - "EMQX_NAME=emqx"
      - "EMQX_HOST=node1.emqx.mydomain.com"
      - "EMQX_LOADED_PLUGINS=emqx_recon,emqx_retainer,emqx_management,emqx_dashboard"
    ports:
      - 18083:18083
      - 1883:1883
    volumes:
      - ./emqx_data:/opt/emqx/data
      - ./emqx_log:/opt/emqx/log
    networks:
      emqx:
        aliases:
          - "node1.emqx.mydomain.com"

 

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in Container, Docker, EMQX, MQTT

How to use custom port for ZeroTier instead of 9993 on Linux

You can create /var/lib/zerotier-one/local.conf – by default it doesn’t exist, if it does, just add these settings:

{
  "settings": {
    "primaryPort": 9994
  }
}

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in Linux, Networking, ZeroTier

How I fixed zerotier-one: fatal error: cannot bind to local control interface port 9993

Problem:

On my server, which was running zerotier already using docker, I wanted to install zerotier on a system level.

but whenever I ran zerotier-cli I saw the following error message:

zerotier-one: fatal error: cannot bind to local control interface port 9993

and when I tried to start the daemon using zerotier-one -d this error message was displayed:

zerotier-cli: missing port and zerotier-one.port not found in /var/lib/zerotier-one

Solution:

In my case, this was due to the standard port 9993 already being used by the dockerized zerotier. Therefore I needed to configure a custom port by creating /var/lib/zerotier-one/local.conf:

{
  "settings": {
    "primaryPort": 9994
  }
}

You can choose any port you like.

Posted by Uli Köhler in Networking, ZeroTier

How I create my wildcard certificates using certbot

When I’m not using traefik to automagically manage my Let’s Encrypt certificates, this is my preferred way to create Let’s Encrypt wildcard certificates. I use the certbot cloudflare plugin in order to perform the DNS-01 challenge which is required in order to obtain the certificate.

First, I create the script in /etc/letsencrypt/wildcard-mydomain.sh

#!/bin/sh
sudo certbot certonly -d mydomain.de,*.mydomain.de --dns-cloudflare --dns-cloudflare-credentials /etc/letsencrypt/cloudflare-mydomain.ini --preferred-challenges dns-01

and, if not already present, I also create the credentials file /etc/letsencrypt/cloudflare-mydomain.ini (replace the credentials by your cloudflare email and API key):

dns_cloudflare_email = "[email protected]"
dns_cloudflare_api_key = "f4a800573c41858be35aaead4e73d741"

After that, you only have to run the script once:

bash /etc/letsencrypt/wildcard-mydomain.sh

If the process succeeds, your certificate will be in /etc/letsencrypt/live/mydomain.de. However you need to ensure to regularly run certbot renew in order to renew the certificates which are only valid for 3 months.

In our previous post How to automatically renew Let’s Encrypt certbot certs on Ubuntu we provide a simple solution to install a system service to automatically renew the certificates daily. It’s extremely easy to install using just a single command to install the systemd service.

Posted by Uli Köhler in Networking

How to fix MikroTik RouterOS v7 SSH port forwarding not working: Connection refused

In multiple models of MikroTik routers running RouterOS v7.5 I got Error: Connection refused when running simple SSH port forwarding commands such as

ssh [email protected] -L 8080:192.168.178.1:80

but in the RouterLS log I could see multiple local forwarding forbidden error messages:

Solution

In this case, the solution was simple: Go to IP -> SSH in WebFig or Winbox and set Forwarding Enabled to Both and click Apply.

If you have already set Forwarding Enabled to Both or Localon one of my routers this setting wasn’t properly activated – possibly after a RoutreOS upgrade. In order to fix this, set Forwarding Enabled to no, click Apply, then  set Forwarding Enabled to Both and click Apply again. For me, this fixed the issue of being unable to do SSH port forwarding.

Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik, Networking

How to install ZeroTier client on Raspberry Pi (Raspbian) in just 20 seconds

Run this command to install the ZeroTier client on Rasbian. You can use the same command to install ZeroTier on virtually any Linux platform.

curl -s https://install.zerotier.com | sudo bash

Source: ZeroTier installation website

Posted by Uli Köhler in Networking, ZeroTier

How to import certificate and private key (.pem) in MikroTik RouterOS

In RouterOS, you can simply import .pem files using /certificate import no matter if the file contains a certificate and/or a private key.

First, upload them either via WebFig (Files) or via SCP to the filesystem of the Router.

We will assume the certificate is called cert.pem while the private key is called privkey.pem

After that, import the certificate and the private key, one after another:

/certificate/import file-name="cert.pem" passphrase="" name="mikrotik.mydomain.net"
/certificate/import file-name="privkey.pem" passphrase="" name="mikrotik.mydomain.net"

This will tell you that first the certificate and then the private key have been successfully imported:

[[email protected]] > /certificate/import file-name=cert.pem passphrase="" name="mikrotik.mydomain.com"
     certificates-imported: 1
     private-keys-imported: 0
            files-imported: 1
       decryption-failures: 0
  keys-with-no-certificate: 0

[[email protected]] > /certificate/import file-name=privkey.pem passphrase="" name="mikrotik.mydomain.com"
     certificates-imported: 0
     private-keys-imported: 1
            files-imported: 1
       decryption-failures: 0
  keys-with-no-certificate: 0

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik, Networking

How to set static IP address on ESP32

TL;DR

Before you call WiFi.begin(...), call this:

if (!WiFi.config(
      IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 5), // ESP's IP address
      IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 1), // Gateway
      IPAddress(255, 255, 255, 0), // IP Address
      IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 1) // DNS server
    )) {
  Serial.println("Failed to set static IP");
}

and replace the IP address etc with the static

Full example

This is based on our previous post on How to fix ESP32 not connecting to the Wifi network:

#include <Arduino.h>
#include <WiFi.h>

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(115200);
  WiFi.begin("MyWifiSSID", "MyWifiPassword");

  // Set static IP
  if (!WiFi.config(
        IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 5), // ESP's IP address
        IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 2), // Gateway
        IPAddress(255, 255, 255, 0), // IP Address
        IPAddress(192, 168, 19, 1) // DNS server
      )) {
    Serial.println("Failed to set static IP");
  }

  // Wait for wifi to be connected
  uint32_t notConnectedCounter = 0;
  while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
      delay(100);
      Serial.println("Wifi connecting...");
      notConnectedCounter++;
      if(notConnectedCounter > 150) { // Reset board if not connected after 5s
          Serial.println("Resetting due to Wifi not connecting...");
          ESP.restart();
      }
  }
  Serial.print("Wifi connected, IP address: ");
  Serial.println(WiFi.localIP());
}

void loop() {
  // put your main code here, to run repeatedly:
}

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in Embedded, ESP8266/ESP32, Networking

How to install ESP32 espota.py on Linux

Currently there is no pip install ... way of installing espota.py. The easiest way of installing it is to download it from GitHub:

wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/espressif/arduino-esp32/master/tools/espota.py

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in Embedded, ESP8266/ESP32, Networking

How to fix ESP32 esptool.py Running stub… StopIteration

Problem:

When flashing an ESP32, especially when flashing remotely, you see the following log message

Serial port rfc2217://10.1.2.3.105:4418
Connecting...
Device PID identification is only supported on COM and /dev/ serial ports.
..
Chip is ESP32-S2
Features: WiFi, No Embedded Flash, No Embedded PSRAM, ADC and temperature sensor calibration in BLK2 of efuse V2
Crystal is 40MHz
MAC: 60:55:f9:f0:3a:16
Uploading stub...
Running stub...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/local/bin/esptool.py", line 34, in <module>
    esptool._main()
  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/__init__.py", line 1004, in _main
    main()
  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/__init__.py", line 684, in main
    esp = esp.run_stub()
  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/loader.py", line 912, in run_stub
    p = self.read()
  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/loader.py", line 307, in read
    return next(self._slip_reader)
StopIteration

Solution:

This issue occurs not because of a hardware defect but because the latency of the connection is quite high and therefore the timeout occurs before the communication between the script and the bootloader can happen.

In order to fix it, you need to edit the hard-coded default timeout in the esptool.py installation!

First, you need to identify the location of loader.py in your installation. You can simply do that from the following part of the stack trace:

File "/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/loader.py", line 912, in run_stub p = self.read()

In this case, loader.py is located at

/usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/loader.py

You need to edit the following line:

MEM_END_ROM_TIMEOUT = 0.05  # short timeout for ESP_MEM_END, as it may never respond

and increase the timeout – my recommendation is to increase it to 2.5 seconds.

… or you can simply change the timeout using the following command:

sed -i -e 's/MEM_END_ROM_TIMEOUT = 0.05/MEM_END_ROM_TIMEOUT = 2.5/g' /usr/local/lib/python3.8/dist-packages/esptool/loader.py

After that, your upload should work just fine.

Posted by Uli Köhler in Electronics, Embedded, ESP8266/ESP32, Networking

How to get current time in MikroTik RouterOS script

In order to get the current time in RouterOS, use

/system clock get time

The time returned will be in hh:mm:dd format and local time

For example, the following command will print the current time:

:put [/system clock get time]

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik, Networking

How to print in MikroTik RouterOS script

In order to print from within a RouterOS script on a MikroTik router, use

:put

For example,

:put [/system clock get time]

will print, for example

[[email protected]] > :put [/system clock get time]
22:55:11

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik, Networking

How to make MikroTik router boot using PXE (netboot) / BOOTP

My experience is that PXE on MikroTik devices only works properly when you trigger it using the hardware reset button. You can also trigger it using System -> RouterBOARD -> Settings but this reproducibly didn’t work for me.

This method was tested on the hEX PoE Lite (i.e. RB750UPr2)

Method of triggering Netboot using the RESET button

  1. Unplug all (!) power supplies from your router. This includes PoE if used. Check if all LEDs are off.
  2. Press the reset button, you should hear a small click sound. Sometimes these are a little bit hard to press, sometimes you think you’ve pressed it but you didn’t since the button is sometimes smaller than the hole. I use tweezers to press it. Keep the reset button pressed until you’ve finished the procedure.
  3. Keep pressing the reset button while plugging in the power supply
  4. While still keeping the reset button pressed, wait for the following phases of reset:
    1. After ~5 seconds one of the LEDs will start to blink
    2. After a further 5 seconds, the LED will stop blinking and turn on permanently
    3. After a further 5 seconds, the LED will turn off permanently.
  5. Only after you see the LED go dark after these three phases (approximately 15 seconds), release the reset button
  6. The router should now boot using PXE
Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik

How to flash OpenWRT on hEX PoE Lite (RB750UPr2)

Important note: Flashing OpenWRT permanently breaks PoE out functionality (I have not tested) even after reinstalling RouterOS! PoE does not work on OpenWRT either!

I had significant problem with the official instructions of flashing OpenWRT on the MikroTik hEX PoE Lite as described on the OpenWRT wiki. I used RouterOS 7.4.1 and a Linux host for the flash process.

Specificially, starting the flash process from within RouterOS via System -> RouterBoard -> Settings did not work, neither with the backup bootloader nor without it, neither with DHCP nor with BOOTP. This caused a boot-and-DHCP-request loop with the log shown blow

Steps to flash OpenWRT on the RB750UPr2

… and probably most other RouterOS boards. There is no specific requirement  for the firmware version. RouterOS 6.47 works. RouterOS 7.4.1 works. I didn’t check any one beside that, but most likely it won’t make a difference. Specifically, there is no need to downgrade if using this method! The RouterOS downgrade is only neccessary for some old-ish Windows based flash method.

1 – Connect a ethernet cable from your flashing computer to the first Ethernet connector of the router.

PXE will only work on this specific port and will not work on other ports!

2 – Setup your flashing computer’s IP interface config.

We’ll use eth0 in this example. Be sure to use the correct interface

sudo ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.10 netmask 255.255.255.0

I read somewhere that MikroTiks expect the PXE host to be at IP 192.168.1.10 – this definitively works. Other IP addresses might or might not also work, I didn’t check. Just use that one.

3 – Setup dnsmasq

sudo apt -y install dnsmasq

and then do not forget to stop dnsmasq and remove the default config

sudo systemctl disable --now dnsmasq
sudo mv /etc/dnsmasq.conf /etc/dnsmasq.default.conf

4 – Download the correct image from OpenWRT

Google for OpenWRT + your RouterBoard type, e.g. OpenWRT RB750UPr2. This will lead you to a site like this one. Scroll down and download both the Firmware OpenWrt Install URL and the Firmware OpenWrt Upgrade URLIn the end you will need both anyway, but for now we need the one ending with ...-initramfs-kernel.img!

Save that file with the original name. The name does not matter – what matters is only that you use the correct image, not the ...-sysupgrade.bin for PXE boot! There is absolutely no need to name the file vmlinux etc.

5 – Startup dnsmasq server

In the following command, be sure to set the correct image name in the --dhcp-boot line

sudo /usr/sbin/dnsmasq \
--no-daemon \
--listen-address 192.168.1.10 \
--bind-interfaces \
-p0 \
--dhcp-authoritative \
--dhcp-range=192.168.1.100,192.168.1.200 \
--bootp-dynamic \
--dhcp-boot=openwrt-19.07.10-ar71xx-mikrotik-rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin \
--log-dhcp \
--enable-tftp \
--tftp-root=$(pwd)

6 – Reset the router into PXE boot mode

As noted above, resetting via RouterOS did not work for me at all. I can only recommend this method, which I also described in my blogpost How to make MikroTik router boot using PXE (netboot) / BOOTP

  1. Unplug all (!) power supplies from your router. This includes PoE if used. Check if all LEDs are off.
  2. Press the reset button, you should hear a small click sound. Sometimes these are a little bit hard to press, sometimes you think you’ve pressed it but you didn’t since the button is sometimes smaller than the hole. I use tweezers to press it. Keep the reset button pressed until you’ve finished the procedure.
  3. Keep pressing the reset button while plugging in the power supply
  4. While still keeping the reset button pressed, wait for the following phases of reset:
    1. After ~5 seconds one of the LEDs will start to blink
    2. After a further 5 seconds, the LED will stop blinking and turn on permanently
    3. After a further 5 seconds, the LED will turn off permanently.
  5. Only after you see the LED go dark after these three phases (approximately 15 seconds), release the reset button
  6. The router should now boot using PXE

7 – Proceed with OpenWRT

If the reset & PXE boot worked, OpenWRT is running on 192.168.1.1On most MikroTik devices, you need to plugin the Ethernet to one of the LAN ports (typically every port except the first port) in order to access OpenWRT. Note that DHCP is not active by default.

The next step is basically to check if OpenWRT works properly and then install it to the flash using the ...-sysupgrade.bin image which we have downloaded before. This is rather easy and performed using the Web UI, it’s best to check the OpenWRT wiki page for more details.

Error log when starting the PXE flash via RouterOS

See above for the procedure that works. This error occured when I didn’t start the PXE process via the Reset button

dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1534706347 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 4257818828 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 1683968382 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 424531201 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3459997603 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 tags: eth1
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.1.100 dc:2c:6e:d7:60:9d 
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 requested options: 1:netmask, 3:router
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 bootfile name: rb-nor-flash-16M-initramfs-kernel.bin
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 next server: 192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  1 option: 53 message-type  2
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option: 54 server-identifier  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option: 51 lease-time  1h
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option: 58 T1  30m
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option: 59 T2  52m30s
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option:  1 netmask  255.255.255.0
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option: 28 broadcast  192.168.1.255
dnsmasq-dhcp: 657189184 sent size:  4 option:  3 router  192.168.1.10
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 available DHCP range: 192.168.1.100 -- 192.168.1.200
dnsmasq-dhcp: 3031796432 vendor class: Mips_boot

 

Posted by Uli Köhler in MikroTik, Networking, OpenWRT